New York State Continues Gun Control ‘Crusade’

The New York State Legislature plowed ahead with its gun control “crusade” on Tuesday by passing its first gun control package since 2013 when the NYS Safe Act was signed into law.

The package would ban teachers from carrying firearms at school, ban stump stocks, allow courts to determine if an individual is too much of a threat to have guns in their home and remove them, establish a fund and guidance for gun buy backs, and extend the completion time for background checks to 30 days.

In a meeting with gun control advocates, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo hailed the Legislature’s move and said he would sign the package into law:

“Today is the next evolution in this ongoing crusade… Now, you’ll see the political extremes rise up, same argument for the past 25 years. ‘Oh, it’s another restriction, it’s another slippery slope. They won’t be happy until they take my gun.’ No one wants to guns from legal gun owners who are mentally healthy. We don’t want people who are mentally ill or past felons to have guns. That’s all this is.”

Cuomo encouraged the legislature to pass more gun control measures, “I don’t want you to think the job is done today” he said during his meeting.

Legislative leaders indicated they would be willing to take action on an ammunition database, gun-storage requirements, and restrictions on 3D gun printing.

Critics of the package of package say it was rushed through the legislative process and not well thought out and described it as a “gun grab.”

Republican lawmakers also voiced concern over the so-called “Red Flag” laws that allow specific individuals such as police officers, teachers, or the individual’s relatives to petition a court to restrict that person’s access to guns if it is determined they are at risk of harming themself or others.

State Senator Daphne Jordan from Halfmoon, New York said she does not believe that the “Red Flag” laws provide enough assurances that “anyone that’s disgruntled against someone else” could petition a court and have someone’s firearm taken away.

Republican lawmakers also voiced outrage that the law bans teachers from carrying firearms in school. Previously, that decision was left to the school districts and Republicans say that should not change.

The Democratic Senate Majority Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins promised that the the legislature would not wait another six years to pass more gun control legislation. Stewart-Cousins indicated the legislature would take a look at laws banning firearms that can’t be detected by scanners, a measure that was included in Tuesday’s package but was ultimately removed.

New York State Legislature plowed ahead with its gun control “crusade” on Tuesday by passing its first gun control package since 2013 when the NYS Safe Act was signed into law.

The package would ban teachers from carrying firearms at school, ban stump stocks, allow courts to determine if an individual is too much of a threat to have guns in their home and remove them, establish a fund and guidance for gun buy backs, and extend the completion time for background checks to 30 days.

In a meeting with gun control advocates, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo hailed the Legislature’s move and said he would sign the package into law:

“Today is the next evolution in this ongoing crusade… Now, you’ll see the political extremes rise up, same argument for the past 25 years. ‘Oh, it’s another restriction, it’s another slippery slope. They won’t be happy until they take my gun.’ No one wants to guns from legal gun owners who are mentally healthy. We don’t want people who are mentally ill or past felons to have guns. That’s all this is.”

Cuomo encouraged the legislature to pass more gun control measures, “I don’t want you to think the job is done today” he said during his meeting.

Legislative leaders indicated they would be willing to take action on an ammunition database, gun-storage requirements, and restrictions on 3D gun printing.

Critics of the package of package say it was rushed through the legislative process and not well thought out and described it as a “gun grab.”

Republican lawmakers also voiced concern over the so-called “Red Flag” laws that allow specific individuals such as police officers, teachers, or the individual’s relatives to petition a court to restrict that person’s access to guns if it is determined they are at risk of harming themself or others.

State Senator Daphne Jordan from Halfmoon, New York said she does not believe that the “Red Flag” laws provide enough assurances that “anyone that’s disgruntled against someone else” could petition a court and have someone’s firearm taken away.

Republican lawmakers also voiced outrage that the law bans teachers from carrying firearms in school. Previously, that decision was left to the school districts and Republicans say that should not change.

The Democratic Senate Majority Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins promised that the the legislature would not wait another six years to pass more gun control legislation. Stewart-Cousins indicated the legislature would take a look at laws banning firearms that can’t be detected by scanners, a measure that was included in Tuesday’s package but was ultimately removed.

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